Posts Tagged ‘Devon’

River 20

Snow

Bass

River 20

River 14

Mullet

Large Mouth

Bream

Bream

Weaver

Huss

Hallo

Wrasse

After almost a month of beautiful weather something had to give. April being famous for it’s ’showers’ decided to make a fool out of everyone by turning the rain up to eleven. I don’t mind the rain except when it makes the water of the upper Teign rise to an unfishable level. With a little re-adjustment and finger crossing my Easter plans to fish the Teign came to fruition.

Checking the upper Teign webcam (thanks Nick!) I loaded up the car and headed out. For those looking at the webcam, if you can see the boulder on the top right nearest the bridge, the vegetation on the left in the river, and the boulder in the bottom right then you are good to go.

I was using a goldhead / tungsten bead nymph suspended beneath a foamed top Klinkhammer. This always serves me well on the Teign especially when the fish are taking both off the surface and below. The Klink acting as both a fly and a bite indicator. The water was still a little on the high side so the fish were hard to the bottom. Getting the fly down quickly and efficiently was important. Degreasing the leader, putting a tungsten bead on the point and a goldhead at mid water  helped. I found the Salmon Par almost immediately (awesome to see the river is so healthy) and with a few adjustments I managed to hook some small but perfectly formed wild brownies.

For those interested in learning more about the upper Teign check out the UTFA website http://www.upper-teign-fishing.org.uk/ – A tip, you can buy tickets from the Fingle Bridge Inn. The pub however does not open until 11am.

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - It feels good to be a Gangsta

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

The end of the season is fast approaching and looking at my diary over the next couple of months it was quite clear I needed to pay a visit to Kennick trout fishery while I still had the chance. The weather on Sunday was stunning, clear blue skies and an extremely comfortable temperature of around 21c. While it wasn’t ideal trout fishing conditions I am always up for a fishing challenge and what better way could you spend a Sunday afternoon?

Arriving at Kennick around 12 I looked out over the water, flat calm with not a sign of any trout rising or moving. As I made my way to the far side of the reservoir I spoke to a few fishermen, all confirming it was going to be a tough days fishing. I took two rods, a 6wt 9ft Greys GRX-I  rod equipped with a GRX-I reel and sinking line. The other rod was an 8ft 4wt Wychwood Truefly rod equipped with a Pflueger Trion reel and a floating line. Looking in the margins there were plenty of pupa cases/shucks. As I began to work my way through the water depths, fly box and various locations I struggled to find the fish.

A few clouds started to appear and a number of fish started to rise, primarily brownies the occasional rainbow could be seen. Encouraging though it seemed I still failed to get a response, so I started to reach for the less traditional fly patterns. After 2 hours I eventually had a take, the fish came off as quick as it took the lure. I really don’t understand why the goldhead blob in sunburst works so well but whenever the conditions have been tough it consistently produces.

I read a number of articles about the ‘blob’ and how it has caused almost as much controversy as the boobie fly. While it is never my fly of choice I still think it is a valuable addition to anyone’s fly box especially if you are struggling after trying a whole host of traditional patterns. I am certainly not a ‘yob with a blob’, nor am I an ‘Elitist traditionalist’, just being there on the water is enough for me but with hungry cats to feed I feel obligated. Anyway back to the fishing..

Kennick Trout never fail to impress me, each one in perfect condition and always willing to put up a hell of a fight. The stock levels are spot on and I have never come across a fish that has fin damage commonly found on other stocked waters. After landing 3 fish I decided it was time to go home, another happy day fishing at Kennick reservoir.

Although the fishing was tough (I wasn’t alone) Kennick reservoir looked and felt stunning in the beautiful weather. I kept losing myself in the moment, bird life and hypnotic ripples moving across such a vast area of water. As the days shorten and the colours of autumn begin to develop, regardless of catching or not you will get to enjoy an amazing example of the wonderful Devon countryside.

For more information on Kennick reservoir please read my previous post

Kennick Reservoir Trout

Kennick Reservoir Trout

Kennick Reservoir Trout

Kennick Reservoir Trout - great condition