Posts Tagged ‘Brown trout’

Fishing during the Easter weekend was at times challenging. Incredibly gusty wind that couldn’t make up it’s mind which way to blow made for some interesting casting up Kennick Reservoir. I think I set a new PB for losing flies in trees, bracken, goarse and any other fauna that dared sway into back casting range.

In one session myself and Mark caught over 30 fish on a catch and release ticket from a single swim. After the rainbows completely switched off, I decided to see if the fish had moved up in the water. After putting on an intermediate line and a hares ear I cast to a spot where a fish had been rising. After a slow retrieve the line slowly went taught and I was into a fish, a perfect 2lb Kennick Brownie. I would like to say it was down to pure skill and watercraft, in reality it was a bit of an unexpected fluke.

Whoever decided to perform one of the lamest examples of vandalism I have ever witnessed well done, brilliant. I hope you feel awesome about ripping open a ‘catch returns’ lock box as well as chucking a life preserver ring on the floor. Making noises like a chimpanzee while hiding behind a tree will also go down in history as one of the greatest acts of rebellion against fly fishermen.

I unfortunately only managed to squeeze in one upper Teign session (read more here), it is a beautiful place to fish. When fishing well you can really lose yourself in the moment. Waist deep, flicking your line up stream waiting for the lightening bolt of a take. *BOOM* a huge branch hits the water followed by a black Labrador, bugger. I fell in love with my Canon G9 again. Having a compact camera that can take pictures of amazing quality is such a bonus, it fits perfectly in my fishpond chest pack pocket.

Along with my recent aquisition of a Hardy Demon 7 wt rod and my SLA being incredibly difficult to get into the reel seat I decided to take the plunge and get a reel to match. I took a risk and opted for a Hardy Demon 5000 over the 7000. When in the shop the jury was out how much backing I would be able to get on the reel with a Hardy Mach line. When in the shop the ghetto trick of offering up a new fly line doubled over from the packet made it look very tight indeed. Luckily I managed to squeeze around 80 yards of backing onto the spool! It is a very nice set up indeed, the rod as mentioned before fires line effortlessly and the reel is just the icing on the cake. It is such a beautiful piece of kit to handle, use and put away after an excellent day of fishing.

Some pictures, the picture of the brownie was taken with my iphone due to me leaving the SLR on all night :/

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Hardy Demon 5000 and Hardy Mach line

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Hardy Demon 5000 and Hardy Mach line

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Hardy Demon 7 wt

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Kennick Reservoir trout fishery

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Kennick Reservoir - relaxing in the sun

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Kennick Reservoir - Boobies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Kennick Reservoir trout fishery

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Kennick Reservoir - Wild brown trout

After almost a month of beautiful weather something had to give. April being famous for it’s ’showers’ decided to make a fool out of everyone by turning the rain up to eleven. I don’t mind the rain except when it makes the water of the upper Teign rise to an unfishable level. With a little re-adjustment and finger crossing my Easter plans to fish the Teign came to fruition.

Checking the upper Teign webcam (thanks Nick!) I loaded up the car and headed out. For those looking at the webcam, if you can see the boulder on the top right nearest the bridge, the vegetation on the left in the river, and the boulder in the bottom right then you are good to go.

I was using a goldhead / tungsten bead nymph suspended beneath a foamed top Klinkhammer. This always serves me well on the Teign especially when the fish are taking both off the surface and below. The Klink acting as both a fly and a bite indicator. The water was still a little on the high side so the fish were hard to the bottom. Getting the fly down quickly and efficiently was important. Degreasing the leader, putting a tungsten bead on the point and a goldhead at mid water  helped. I found the Salmon Par almost immediately (awesome to see the river is so healthy) and with a few adjustments I managed to hook some small but perfectly formed wild brownies.

For those interested in learning more about the upper Teign check out the UTFA website http://www.upper-teign-fishing.org.uk/ – A tip, you can buy tickets from the Fingle Bridge Inn. The pub however does not open until 11am.

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - It feels good to be a Gangsta

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Upper Teign - fishing for wild brownies

Fly fishing, you’re doing it wrong (sort of)

0, December 29, 2009
Posted by james

On the 27th of December I should have been hauling monster Pollack from the wrecks littering the English Channel. Force 8 winds soon put a stop to that.  Rather than waste another day lounging around eating turkey left overs and imbibing mulled wine we decided to go Fly Fishing.

The cold weather of winter is advantageous to those looking to scratch their fly fishing itch while waiting for the official season to begin in early spring. Most small still water trout fisheries remain open all year. They fish just as well as they do in the warmer months (if not better) and are nearly always void of those water whipping summer enthusiasts. Exe valley is one of the best small still water fisheries in the southwest. I am convinced the quality of fish to be experienced here is down to the high throughput of water.

We began fishing sunburst blobs (a killer fly here) on a slow retrieve and within a matter of minutes all three of us had landed a fish. The idea was to see if we could catch a fish using the most unconventional method possible. Lures had to be retrieved as slowly as possible while buzzers and nymphs were only allowed to be retrieved as fast as humanly possible. I managed to hook into a fish by ripping a gold head hares ear along the margins.

James turned his fishing up to ‘Eleven’ and tried a sunburst blob under a site indicator. As he very very (very) slowly retrieved the fly the water erupted and a fish tail walked 10ft across the surface of the water. “Woah woah woah” Mark yelped “that’s a good fish”. Jim managed to get the fish near the bank and at first it looked like a salmon. It was however the weirdest coloured brown trout, all 14lbs of it! A couple of minutes later Jim was in again, this time it was a ‘mere’ 9lb rainbow. While J. R. Hartley was rolling in his fictional grave we were rolling on the floor laughing.

It is extremely interesting (funny) to see how the trout are willing to take a fly fished in completely the opposite way you would traditionally work it. we wanted to try a team of blobs’n'boobies but as a previous experiment concluded they don’t cast too well.

Meanwhile during a double hook up I threw down the ’speed catch’ gauntlet and was mercifully whooped by the superior pulling power of an 8wt rod. My 5wt greys clicker-drag reel was making a noise like Donald Duck as I battled with my fish in an attempt to land it quicker than Mark.  It is another interesting reminder of much pressure you can apply to a fish with a fly rod, all too often you see fly anglers with barely a bend in the rod allowing the trout to speed towards a weed bed at warp factor 10.

Is there a conclusion to this awesome display of fly fishing? Not really, but do get out fishing, do go with your friends, do try something outside the ‘traditional’ fly fishing box and most importantly make sure you have fun. It was a short session but between the three of us we had 15 fish  (lost another 4 or 5) ranging from 2-14lb. Excellent.

For more info on Exe Valley Fishery look at my previous post found here

Here are some of the photo’s – Nikon D90 ;)

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery

p.s. Another angler managed to land a 15lb fish

Exe Valley Fishery

Exe Valley Fishery